The Storytelling Fundamentals Webinar Series

The Storytelling Fundamentals Webinar Series

Believe it or not, there are a limited number of storytelling fundamentals but the problem for us writers is that they haven't been codified. So even though theorists explain concepts in the best way they can, they're using different (and sometimes conflicting) terms and frequently, the language is either overly simplified or overly complicated.

Our writing time is limited. We're pursuing our dream of being an author while also working a full-time job, raising a family, caring for ageing parents and fulfilling a hundred other responsibilities. We simply can't afford to sacrifice all our writing time trying to decipher the theory.

That's where this webinar series comes in.

My specialty is putting story theory into practice. I've spent many years, and many tens of thousands of dollars, studying and doing the research so you don't have to.

If you're wondering whether these webinars are worth it, ask yourself this: if you're not willing to invest in your career, why should anyone else?

Why would an agent or acquisitions editor put their careers on the line for yours? Why would a reader spend her hard-earned money on a book, and her precious time reading a story, when the author couldn't be bothered to spend time and money learning the craft?

Don't Miss Out

You can’t afford to miss these webinars. To be notified when the next event takes place, sign up below.

Storytelling Fundamentals

Storytelling Fundamentals

If you're new to story theory, or if story theory gives you a headache and makes you want to scream, this is the webinar for you. I cover all the key concepts you need to know and I present them in a way that enables you to see an immediate improvement in your writing.

You can spend literally years of your life sifting through thousands of dollars worth of theory books hoping that you're interpreting the information correctly, or you can spend an hour and a couple of bucks on a webinar with an expert and get all the information you need. The choice is up to you.

Nail the Plot

Nail the Plot

Plot and genre aren't the same thing, although they do intersect. In this webinar, plot refers to the shape of a story. Most writers have no idea that there are options available to them and as a result, they run into all kinds of story problems.

I designed this webinar to answer some of the most common questions I get from authors, including:

  • How do I write a story with more than one protagonist?
  • I'm stuck in the middle of my story. How do I get unstuck?
  • The hero's/heroine's journey is overused. How do I write something different?
  • How do I write a story with more than one plotline (parallel or intersecting)?
  • My story moves around in time, but I've heard that I shouldn't use flashbacks and flashforwards. Is this true? Why or why not?

Characters We Love

Characters We Love

If your protagonist really is who he/she appears to be, your story is in trouble. Flat characters and stereotypes are boring, and readers won't put up with it. So, how do you write a nuanced protagonist that will capture your reader's imagination? That's exactly what this webinar is about.

Point of View

Point of View

There's a lot more to Point of View (POV) than first, second and third, yet most writers give it very little thought. We tend to make our choices arbitrarily or because we think it's expected of the genre we're writing in. But consider this: POV choice is one of the reasons GONE GIRL revolutionized the thriller genre. Before GONE GIRL, thrillers were written in third person. Gillian Flynn used a dual first-person narrative and it was like a breath of fresh air to fans of the genre.

How many different POVs are there (hint: it's more than three)? What are the pros and cons of each? How do you know which POV to choose? What's the difference between POV and Narrative Voice? When would you use Free Indirect Style?

If you don't know the answers to these questions, then this webinar is for you.

Show AND Tell: Exposition

Show AND Tell: Exposition

I'm sure you've heard the adage "show don't tell" when it comes to writing fiction. Well guess what? It's wrong. The truth is that writers need to understand how to show AND tell a story.

"Show" means to dramatize the story events so that the reader is immersed in the narrative.

"Tell" means that information is told to the reader without any dramatization.

The whole "show don't tell" thing came about because writers were telling the entire narrative and frankly that makes for a really dull story that rarely, if ever, works. But if you "show" the entire narrative it isn't necessarily any more interesting. In fact, it usually just gets bogged down.

The "tell" part is called exposition, and when done properly it has an unbelievably positive impact on your story's pacing and narrative drive.

This webinar is all about how and when to effectively use exposition to write a story that readers can't put down.

The Hero's Gift Expressed

The Hero's Gift Expressed

Understanding the hero's gift and how it's expressed is one of the best kept secrets in story theory. There is no trick to writing a novel, but sometimes, this feels awfully close.

This one concept is the key to unlocking the first and last acts of your story...and that’s half the manuscript!

Need I say more?

Hook Your Reader (in 10 pages or less)

Hook Your Reader (in 10 pages or less)

We all know we need to hook our reader, but what does that mean and how do we do it? The good news is that it's not a magic trick and it's not guesswork. There's a tried-and-true way to do it and in this webinar, I'll teach you exactly what it is.

Agents get hundreds of query letters every day, and once they've passed on your book, you can't revise and resubmit. Amazon has 50 million titles in its store right now. When a reader lands on your book page, that free preview must convince them to make a purchase.

You've spent years on your manuscript. You've poured your soul into it, and you've dreamed of seeing it in the bookstore. When the stakes are this high, are you really going to cross your fingers and hope your first ten pages work? Or, are you going to spend an hour to make sure they work?

This webinar is for writers who already have an understanding of storytelling fundamentals.

Write a Page-Turner

Write a Page-Turner

Believe it or not, it's easier to get someone to buy your book than it is to get him/her to read it.

It's one thing to hook your readers in the opening pages of your book, it's another thing to hold that attention all the way to the very last page. This is a word-of-mouth industry which means it doesn't matter how much money you pour into your marketing. If you want to earn a living in this business, readers must tell other readers.

For that to happen, you need to understand what drives a story forward. Narrative Drive isn't a storytelling principle in and of itself. Rather, it's an effect that's created when other storytelling principles work together.

This webinar is for writers who already have an understanding of storytelling fundamentals.

Scenes that Work (Scene-Writing Essentials)

Scenes that Work (Scene-Writing Essentials)

Without question, the number one storytelling problem authors have is that they don't know how to write a scene that works.

This is serious, because when the scenes don't work, the story doesn't work. If the story doesn't work, it's game over.

This webinar is for you if:

  • You're unsure what it means for a scene to "work"
  • you don't know how to evaluate your manuscript to find scene-level problems
  • you think you know how to write scenes but your manuscript still feels wonky
  • agents are rejecting your query
  • your indie-published books aren't selling

Scene Types

Scene Types

Yes, there are types of scenes. When I discovered this, it revolutionized my writing and it will revolutionize yours too.

I'm not talking about the obligatory scenes of a given genre (for example, in a love story the lovers have to meet). Nor am I referring to the phases of the hero's journey (for example, the meeting-the-mentor scene).

Scene types are all about where a scene takes place and what the characters are doing. It might not sound like much but trust me, the impact these two things will have on your writing will blow your mind. It'll have you writing better stories, faster.

This webinar is for writers who already have an understanding of storytelling fundamentals.